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Restorative Justice

Harris County, Public Interest Legal Foundation reach agreement, end lawsuit
By April Bamburg

A lawsuit against Harris County is over after the county and the Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF), an Indianapolis-based organization, reached a settlement. The federal district court in Houston entered the settlement agreement March 17, 2020.

Economic Mobility

New study examines Millennial migration
By April Bamburg

A new study reveals that Millennials are moving to the Heartland in greater numbers.

Housing & Development

Many housing markets see increased affordability after drop in mortgage rates due to COVID-19
By April Bamburg

Housing may now be more affordable, thanks to the recent drop in mortgage rates spurred on by fears and uncertainty brought on by the spread of the novel coronavirus, according to a real estate market analysis by Redfin.

Housing & Development

Officials take action to lessen eviction and foreclosure worries
By April Bamburg

Across the country, the uncertainty associated with the COVID-19 pandemic has many people worried about the health of their family members and others about whether or not they’ll have housing in the coming weeks and months.

Urban Community

Maryland passes education reform bill
By Pat Morris

With the coronavirus emergency breathing down its neck, the Maryland legislature agreed Tuesday to end its session two weeks early. And it ended by approving a massive education reform for the state.

Poverty

Robin Hood exec says poor don't benefit from their work
By Pat Morris

On March 3, while the COVID-19 pandemic was under way but before its financial consequences hit the U.S. with a hammer, Wes Moore was pointing out to Yahoo Finance (YF) what he called the dishonestly of an economic system that, he said, does not at all reward those at the bottom for working. Although it pretends it does.

Housing & Development

Dolcefino questions Houston Housing Authority's dealings regarding new low-income housing in the East End
By April Bamburg

Wayne Dolcefino is still questioning the actions of the Houston Housing Authority, particularly in relation to a real estate deal that would see HHA spend $12.9 million on six acres of land that no one can live on.

Texas lacks affordable housing for renters, report shows
By Kasey Schefflin-Emrich

While there has been an increase in available housing units in Texas, many renters are struggling to affordable them.

Poverty

New Philadelphia poverty reduction plan may help thousands
By Hollie Ferguson

A new plan to reduce the number of people living in poverty in The City of Brotherly Love has been put forward with the Philadelphia Poverty Plan.

Restorative Justice

New education incentive to reduce New Jersey incarceration sentences
By Hollie Ferguson

Incarcerated individuals in New Jersey now have the opportunity to have their sentences reduced through a new education incentive introduced by the New Jersey Department of Corrections.

Housing & Development

Atlanta mulls affordable housing options
By Pat Morris

Which comes first, the buildings or the land? That is one question the Atlanta City Council is mulling as it decides how to allocate the $1 million for the Housing Opportunity Bond Fund that Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms called for in a Feb. 17 executive order.

Housing & Development

Home sweet tiny home for some in San Jose
By Pat Morris

Up to 40 of San Jose’s estimated 6,100 homeless people will have a clean, private, safe place to stay for up to two months while they transition into permanent housing.

Poverty

Proposed new rules for CHIP, SNAP, others could make it harder to be poor
By Pat Morris

“Poor” is a label most people would like to avoid, but the designation is critical to qualifying for vital services such as SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as food stamps), Medicaid, CHIP (Children's Health Insurance Program, or medical care for the children of the working poor), energy assistance and more.

Restorative Justice

N.Y. state district attorneys argue for changes in bail law
By Pat Morris

When the state of New York eliminated cash bail for most nonviolent felonies along with misdemeanors, some protested that the law, which took effect Jan. 1, went too far in removing judicial discretion about the dangers of people who, for example, have criminal records or committed a nonviolent hate crime.

Wolf asks for $6 million to help combat gun violence
By Pat Morris

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf brought a host of supporters to the General Assembly late last month to lobby for $6 million for programs to reduce gun violence. Students from Philadelphia’s public Parkway Northwest High School for Peace and Justice joined lawmakers, activists and community leaders to support the governor’s 2020-21 budget request.

Housing & Development

St. Petersburg considering 'linkage' fee to fund affordable housing
By Pat Morris

St. Petersburg might soon join the list of large and small cities that link approval of new construction, especially of expensive or luxury residences, to mitigate the impact those buildings have on existing residents of more modest means.

Urban Community

Houston Controller urges city officials to achieve a balanced budget after fiscal stress test
By April Bamburg

A "stress test" of Houston’s finances revealed that the city would not handle a recession well, should it come to be.

Housing & Development

Houston Housing Authority outlines housing crisis, offers solutions
By Rich Peters

Access to affordable housing has become a nationwide issue as well as a key talking point for Democrats pushing for the 2020 election to reform policies at the federal level. The city of Houston has been largely impacted by what some are calling an epidemic.

Houston is gentrifying faster than other Texas cities
By James Ledbetter

Texas citizens near downtown have gentrified faster in the Houston area than in any other Texas city, a recent report from the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas confirms.

Rents continue to increase, spreading the affordability crisis throughout the U.S.
By Elle Johnson

The affordability crisis is starting to move inland, making it so earning $40,000 in Omaha won't be enough to comfortably pay rent, the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies research said.